Comparison between Japan and the Great Britain


Japan and Great Britain had many qualities in common and many differences. Japan and Great Britain share some geographical and economic factors such as access to the sea , and navy. There are also many types of geographical landscapes that differ between the two countries. In this text you will learn about many differences and similarities between Britain and Japan.

Some similarities between Britain and Japan are that they are both physically small island countries and are strong commercially. Edward Bissian states “we can by no means overlook the excellent commercial position of the country”(Docs 6 and 4). Both nations developed strong navies for many reasons, one of the main reasons being to protect their countries. Prime Minister Yamagata Aritomo said that “As a result, it is essential that we begin to make significantly larger appropriations for our navy and our armed forces.”. Walter Weston announced that “The fishing industries have helped to provide Japan with a recruiting ground for one of the strongest and most formidable navies of modern times.” (Docs 6 and 4). There were many ports and good access to the ocean and trade. This is shown by Walter Weston stating “Few places inland are far removed from the mountains, and none are really distant from the sea. . . . The land was on all sides well protected, and yet also open to the sea” and Edward Baines saying “[O]ur ports command an unobstructed passage to the Atlantic and to every quarter of the world.” (Docs 6 and 4).

There are a greater number of differences than similarities between Japan and Britain. Excellent harbors, rich supplies of fish, one of the chief articles of food, most formidable navies were all effects of Japan's geography. Walter Weston mentioned that “The deeply indented coastline of Japan provides a number of excellent harbors on the Pacific coast, and its shores abound in fish of all kinds, the rich supplies of which have for centuries constituted one of the chief articles of food of the people. “(Doc. 6). Britain has good ports with access to the Atlantic Ocean. Edward Baines states this fact by saying “[O]ur ports command an unobstructed passage to the Atlantic and to every quarter of the world.” (Doc. 4). Britain is between the north and south of Europe. Edward Baines said that “intermediate between the north and south of Europe, and its insular situation, which, combined with the command of the seas, secures our territory from invasion”(Doc. 7). Japan has a “combination of mountain, valley, and plain, [and] a deeply indented coastline, with its bays, peninsulas, and islands off the coast.” (Doc. 6). The British held lands in Asia, Africa, and the Pacific. (Doc. 1). Japan controlled part of China by 1839. (Doc. 9). Japan had to import large amounts of oil from the US. Trading also helped Japan by allowing it to gain raw materials needed for industrialization and modernization. (Doc. 8). Britain on the other hand Britain's cotton imports increased between 1870 and 1900. This is shown by a graph by Stevenson, J.and Cook, C. Longman in Handbook of Modern British History. Longman Group. 1963. (Doc. 2). Britain exported Opium to get luxury items such as tea and silk from China. The graph shows the opium trade to China from 1729 to 1832. It was produced by Penn State University. (Doc 5). Great Britain would be able to obtain diverse raw materials for goods, have a large market in which to sell finished goods, and provide safe ports for ships transporting goods. (Doc. 1).

Japan and Britain have many similarities and differences in all aspects of their life. Geography and economics are two main areas that share aspects and differ in areas. Britain and Japan have different imports and exports but still rely on trade for their economy. By 1875 about 125 million pounds were used in British textile industry. This is shown by a graph by Stevenson, J.and Cook, C. Longman in Handbook of Modern British History. Longman Group. 1963. (Doc. 2).

Sorry,

We are glad that you like it, but you cannot copy from our website. Just insert your email and this sample will be sent to you.


By clicking “Send”, you agree to our Terms of service and Privacy statement. We will occasionally send you account related emails. x close