Margaret Thatcher Eulogy Rhetorical Analysis



Former Prime Minister of Great Britain, Margret Thatcher, on June 11, 2004, emotionally conveyed her eulogy for President Ronald Reagan. Margaret speaks in a way of honoring him by telling the audience what a good president and great friend he was. Margret beautifully speaks to her audience using imagery as a way to reflect on the past, diction by using words that honor him, and finally, repetition to persuade what she was conveying. Margaret creates a mournful atmosphere in honor and respect for a great President, friend, and family member. 

The first rhetorical device used was Thatcher's imagery. She talks to the audience as if everyone was as close to him as she was. Thatcher sets scenes to demonstrate how diligently Reagan worked caring for everyone and the U.S. She sets a picture in everyone’s minds for them to imagine and see themselves as if Regan was right in front of them. 

The second rhetorical device Thatcher used was her diction. She talks in ways that help the audience picture him as the man that she saw. She uses words that exalt him and build his character. Her words are heartfelt showing these were true emotions and feelings that she had. Thatcher’s words play off her imagery helping the audience feel what she was feeling. Thatcher’s words building Reagan up, helped family and friends cherish past memories they had with him. 

The final rhetorical device Thatcher used was her repetition. She continually builds Reagan up making it known as honorable he was. Thatcher told memories of Reagan saying he never had a dull moment and how he always had the best interest in mind for the country. Her repetition brought light to his good character and morals and really gave Thatcher clarity on the loss of her good friend. Thatcher’s repetition told heartfelt stories and memories that she and his family will never forget, showing just how much he will be missed.