My Experience: The First Covid Lockdown



The first covid lockdown affected everyone but, I would like to write about my experience and how it has affected me. When everything was still normal, Everyone went to school and hung out with friends; all was good. I still remember riding in the car with my friends when the virus was just discovered. Jarrett said that it would blow over like nothing ever happened. Ironically I said it would spread everywhere, and it would cause chaos. Of Course, we all laughed it off. Little did we know what the future had in store. Our daily lives were about to change. Before it all went downhill, Life was normal. We went to school, had an everyday social life. Some of us even had jobs. You could go to the mall and mess around with your friends and eat at a restaurant afterward. At times life was a little predictable, but it was excellent and enjoyable.

At first, I thought covid would blow over like the flu, but it didn’t. It just kept coming, and it didn’t stop.

I was scared and confused with what was happening around me; everything felt so off.

I couldn't hang with friends or even go to the store to buy food. I even got laid off from work. The majority of social events were canceled. It was overwhelming. Everything seemed bland and terrifying at the same time. I lost interest in old hobbies and would sleep instead of doing online school, and I didn't want to do anything.

 Pretty soon, I started failing every class, and all I did was make excuses. It was like living in a broken record: eat, lie, sleep repeat, And that was my daily routine. 

I lied about anything school-related simply because I didn't feel like doing school work. I was foolish, and I realized that a little too late. Eventually, conditions got stable enough to go back to school. It was beginning to brighten up, I could see my friends again talk to someone new, but that didn't happen. When school was back in session, I noticed most kids would not wear a mask, which concerned me. How selfish and rude do you have to be to risk your own and someone else's life?

If I got covid and brought it home to my mother, she would die due to her underlying health conditions, and it would be my fault. I wouldn't be able to live with myself if that happened. So I lied, I told my mom that I was doing online school again. I said this so I could say home and not risk her and my well-being. It was fine at first, do an assignment now and then, stay home and play games. But eventually, it caught up to me; I stopped doing my assignments and just stayed home and played games. So a few phone calls later and  I'm back in school, and I was doing pretty good in the beginning until I started sluffing and going home early. 

 The second quarter started to wind down, and I didn’t have a care in the world.

 I was doing whatever I wanted to do and do it. So I failed most of the second quarter at this time, I realized I couldn’t keep living like this. If I can't graduate, I won't have a promising future. Without a high school diploma, I won't be able to get a high-paying job, move out or have nice things. Without it, I won't have anything.

When I was thinking of ideas for this paper, that was when it hit me; I need to be grateful for what has happened and what hasn't happened. My mom is still alive and well. I got my job at Lisa’s back and was lucky enough to have access to PPE. The majority of my family is safe. Once you sit down and think about what has and what hasn't happened, you learn to be grateful Because so many are not so fortunate. I learned to be thankful and look on the bright side, even if it's a little dim.