The Debate Between W.E.B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington


Two most well-known Black Americans who had so much in common into making the world better eventually discovered different opinions and goals on how they wanted to approach  situations that took a turn into rivalry. Booker was outspoken about slavery and blacks because he lived just like them unlike Dubois, he only cared about those that were already educated. Even along the way the two believers had ideas that were common to saving African Americans, but their disagreements made it worse.  Booker T. Washington was always on top of how blacks were treated through poverty and how they can gain respect through hard work from the whites and learning. Washington states, “... a black man could do for himself and his people if given a chance to obtain an education and engage in useful, productive work.” And with the help of industrial education it will help them to learn how to trade to obtain small businesses. It would help them to be more creative and smart to uplift themselves. On the other hand, Dubois believed blacks should learn how to teach themselves just as whites. W.E.B Dubois implied, “He advocates common-schools and industrustrial training, and depreciates institutions of higher learning; but neither the negro common-schools, nor Tuskegee itself, could remain open a day[...].” Dubois is simply tryna say black schools don't stay open to teach anything. Nevertheless, he truly was talking down on schools that probably will teach Americans a lot then you think instead of thinking they would close down. 

Therefore, unlike [civil] rights Washington and Dubois’ had disagreements on this topic as well. Booker just wanted everyone to have the right to vote on what is right. Booker states, “The wisest among my race [black] understand that the agitation of questions of social equality is extremest folly, and that progress in the enjoyment of all the privileges that will come to us must be the result of severe and constant struggle rather than of artificial forcing.” Washington is saying that black struggle is more severe to have all our rights than trying to force ourselves worse to fit into the world. He also wished anti-black violence could be the main right that would get appendant. Dubois believes nobody should have the right to vote unless you are educated. He doesn’t care if one-tenth of blacks vote and the rest is white. [...] under modern competitive methods, for workingmen and property-owners to defend their rights and exist without the right of suffrage.” Really analyzing that blacks can’t defend their right unless they are in some kind of hardship. When in reality they work just as hard as anyone else. 

Equality came to part between the two when it came to blacks wanting freedom from white so they can be equal.  Booker T. Washington was AGAINST this idea because he just wanted them to come at peace with white instead of adding heat to the fire. He wanted them to forget about all the disgraceful things whites did just to earn their respect. Washington states in Up from Slavery, “...to deport himself modestly in regard to political claims, depending upon the slow but sure influences that proceed from the possession of property, intelligence, and high character for full recognition of  his political rights.” Saying that blacks need to dismiss themselves to be something they are not just to get their rights as a human. When in reality he is not looking at the real picture of how he is hurting blacks point of view. W.E.B. Dubois was up for blacks getting what they deserve at all cost even if it made whites mad. He wanted blacks to stand up for themselves to be praised to earn their rights as African Americans. Dubois states in Criteria of Negro, In all sorts of ways we are hemmed in and our new young artists [young black americans] have got to fight their way to freedom.” Kindly having blacks and young humans to fight for the position of freedom instead of listening to whites any longer.

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