Intel Job Application Essay



Intel, an international computer software and hardware company, hires engineers of many disciplines. Although they primarily hire electrical and computer engineers, they also have a need for mechanical engineers. Mechanical engineers at Intel are tasked with designing, analyzing, and testing their hardware for structural applications, power management, and thermal loads. A position listed on Intel’s website calls for a Datacenter Mechanical Design Engineer. This role requires the engineer to “drive all aspects of the mechanical design,” which includes coordination with team members and vendors, 3D modeling, material selection, structural and thermal analysis, marketing, production evaluation, and more. The role encompasses a broad range of skill sets and requires an engineer with a comprehensive portfolio.

In relation to skills present on my resume, some major qualities of the desired candidate stood out to me. One aspect of the position I found notable was the focus on good working knowledge of 3D modeling, specifically with SolidWorks. This is directly associated with the skills on my resume from my time working with General Atomics and Cal Poly Pomona student competition teams. Both organizations helped me to develop 3D modeling skills and translate those skills into developing manufacturing drawings with the correct tolerances and dimensioning practices. Another skill desired by the company is experience working with ANSYS Mechanical to conduct structural simulation tests. During my time as an intern at General Atomics, I worked with ANSYS Mechanical to conduct a static structural test on a lifting bracket. This bracket was manufactured from my drawings and used to lift a 2000 lb. thermal management system for a high-powered laser. Although this bracket is very different from computer hardware, the skillset required to conduct the analysis is the same. The company’s desire for a candidate with knowledge of design for manufacturing and assembly directly correlates with aspects on my resume previously mentioned. During my time as the Lead Payload Engineer for the NASA Student Launch Team at Cal Poly Pomona, I helped to design parts of the payload. When modeling these components in SolidWorks, I made sure to keep in mind the manufacturability of the components, whether that would be through 3D printing or the purchase of commercial off-the-shelf parts. When products are easily manufacturable or purchasable, this helps to reduce the production cost, something Intel values and lists on the job requisition as a required skill. When selecting the materials for the lifting bracket I designed, I conducted a cost analysis trade study to select the best material based on cost and technical requirements. Finally, the aspect most valued by Intel is a good working knowledge of electro-mechanical systems. Throughout my life I have been involved with personal projects that focus on this very principle. In high school, I built and programmed a self-leveling quadcopter. In college, I built and programmed an electric longboard. I have worked on project teams which are tasked with creating payloads, one of which autonomously ejects from a rocket at an altitude of 500 feet, lands, self-levels, and takes a 3D panoramic photo of the landing site. All of these projects utilize electro-mechanical parts and are listed on my resume. Moreover, I feel that they are applicable to the position listed on Intel’s website. 

In regard to interviewing with Intel, I would make sure to discuss the previously mentioned skillsets and how they apply to working at the company. I would also make sure to include supporting documentation like my cover letter and a portfolio. These two documents would one, allow the company to gain a more in-depth understanding of my character, and two, learn about the more detailed aspects of my work through my portfolio. Although Intel does not hire many mechanical engineers in comparison to electrical engineers, they still have a need for them.